Category Archives: Hypertension

geralt / Pixabay

5 Tips To Prevent Alzheimer’s

These are are sobering numbers. Today estimates from the Alzheimer’s Association suggest that about 44 million people are coping with dementia the world over, with that number expected to triple by 2050 to 115 million. So many people… so much misery. To combat these frightening numbers, experts discussed the latest research at the 2014 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference held in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Here are five important discoveries that came from the conference.

1. Having hypertension in old age may actually protect your brain. Though high blood pressure is known as the “silent killer”, a new study out of the University of California suggest that if you’re over 90 years old, this condition can actually save your brain cells.

The team followed 625 subjects who developed hypertension in their 90s for up to a decade and found that their risk for dementia was 55% lower than those who had a medical history of hypertension. Naturally the study isn’t saying hypertension is good for you, especially considering that it is tied to many other bad things.

Instead, the study presents the idea that when it comes to normal blood pressure, a one-size-fits-all approach may not be right for older people.

2. Lifestyle changes are better made late than never at all. There are a number of changes to lifestyle that can lower the risk for late life cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s. This finding comes as the result of a two-year clinical trial out of the Karolinska Institutet and the Finnish Institute for Health.

The work included 1,260 subjects who were from 60 to 77 years old. One group got a “lifestyle package” that included guidance on what to eat, physical activity and management of heart health risk factors, mental training and social function. The control group got standard health advice, and after two years, the lifestyle package group performed far better on tests of memory and thinking skills.

Start implementing those lifestyle changes at midlife and you can help fight off Alzheimer’s disease. It’s never too late.

3. Playing mental games makes your brain larger. Turns out middle-aged people who are avid game players tend to have bigger brains than those who didn’t do these kinds of activities according to a study that examined brain scans. Think of it like looking at muscle mass – bad when it’s small, good when it’s bigger.

When the researchers examined specific parts of the subject’s brains, they saw that that areas that tend to be damaged by Alzheimer’s disease were actually bigger. These larger areas are associated with higher scores on tests of cognitive ability. Mixing up the games, or engaging in another stimulating activity, is great for the brain – anything that offers a cognitive challenge keeps the brain in shape over the long haul.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Overweight? Shocking Proof that it may not be your fault

99% of the “professional” weight loss techniques are wrong – ending up with you actually putting on weight rather than losing it.

Find out why counting calories is bad for you and can sabotage your dieting efforts.

Click through now to discover how to drop 9lbs every 11 days…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


5 Tips To Prevent Alzheimer’s Continued…

4. Exercise benefits your brain. Being active appears to slow the progression toward dementia according to two sets of data out of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. What’s more, exercise positively influences how mild cognitive impairment and dementia present and progress.

In one group of subjects who had mild cognitive impairment, working out appeared to protect against developing dementia. Data for another group of healthy patients who exercised showed they were less apt to be diagnosed with cognitive impairment than those who did not exercise, either lightly or vigorously.

While not a cure, exercise is certainly good for your brain.

5. Alzheimer’s may soon be detected by a smell test. A test of your sense of smell might actually help your doctor tell if you are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Results from two separate projects find that those who were unable to identify some odors were more likely to experience cognitive impairment. The experts think that the brain cells that are key to a sense of smell may be killed off in the early stages of dementia. A simple, non-invasive diagnostic test would be a huge step forward.

With a test to spot the early symptoms, doctors believe they could intervene early and treat sooner, and this will slow the progression of this devastating disease.

To your good health,

geralt / Pixabay

Diabetes, Hypertension Can Cause Memory Problems Later

Here’s news on an important new study appearing in the journal Neurology. Anyone who is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure during middle age seems to be more likely to have brain damage that contributes to dementia as they get older. While diabetes and problems with memory and cognition later on have been linked before; this is the first study to offer solid evidence that explains just why this happens.

The thinking is that diabetes might really be shrinking the brain over the long haul, cutting the size of key areas such as the hippocampus. This is the structure that plays a huge role in both short and long term memory. What’s more, when high blood pressure is added to the mix, the two together appear to up your risks of micro strokes and other types of damage to the blood vessels that feed the brain.

The current study included over 1,400 people of an average age of 80 years old who had (at most) slight memory and cognitive problems classified as mild cognitive impairment. The team measured the subjects’ thinking and memory abilities and noted any areas of mild impairment. The subjects then underwent MRI scans to look for brain damage that can be an early indicator of dementia.

As a final step, the team reviewed the subjects’ medical records to see if they had been diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure during their middle age. The team saw that those who had diabetes at midlife had brains that were 2.9% smaller than those who didn’t have this disease. The hippocampus of these subjects were even smaller, 4% smaller (on average) than non-diabetics. When the hippocampus starts to shrink, you start losing your long-term memory, as well as your ability to bring to mind recent events.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Overweight? Shocking Proof that it may not be your fault

99% of the “professional” weight loss techniques are wrong – ending up with you actually putting on weight rather than losing it.

Find out why counting calories is bad for you and can sabotage your dieting efforts.

Discover a new way to effortlessly shed unwanted pounds and drop 9 lbs. every 11 days.

This diet is called the “Idiot Proof Diet” because it’s all worked out for you and there’s no need for calorie counting or label reading.

Click through to find out how you can be slimmer with this innovative new weight loss system…

Click through now to discover how to drop 9lbs every 11 days…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Diabetes, Hypertension Can Cause Memory Problems Later Continued…

Diabetes at midlife was also linked with an 85% greater risk of micro-strokes in the brain. These subjects were also two times as likely to have memory or thinking problems than those who did not have this disease earlier in life. Also those who had high blood pressure at midlife were two times as likely to show damage due to stroke to parts of the brain that are linked to thinking, memory and language.

According to lead study author Dr. Rosebud Roberts from the Mayo Clinic, those who had diabetes earlier in life have a much poorer brain structure than those who got it later on. Cognitive impairment appears to come over a long time period, so if you have diabetes earlier, there’s more time to do more damage.

Alzheimer’s Association director of scientific programs Keith Fargo was very excited about the study. Many people mistakenly think that the risk for Alzheimer’s disease comes only if it runs in their family, but this is not true. Dementia can hit anyone if they don’t take care of themselves. This research points out the very real need for people in their 40s, 50s and 60s to live a healthier lifestyle so they can avoid disease now, and in the years to come.

To your good health,

How Noise Impact On Your Health

Now hear this… turn down the noise. The combined impact of noise on the job, in the environment and as part of recreational activities has been found to be the source of a serious public health threat that goes beyond damage to our hearing. Sound has been shown to impact other indicators of bodily health as well as hearing. And with an aging population living in our always-on world, hearing loss (not to mention other health indicators) are already under fire.

These days noise is everywhere, and finding a quiet place is getting harder all the time. Think about it… ear buds blast music, the subway roars, hospital monitors beep, keyboards click, leaf blowers shatter the silence, even the noise of traffic is all around us. Occupational noise and the impact it has on hearing has been very well studied, and in recent years research has broadened to look at the noise of social situations, like in a bar or from personal music players. Noise from the environment – traffic, trains and planes overhead – has also been studied.

The work on noise and health appears in The Lancet, and examined the latest studies on the impact of noise on several key health indicators – things like hearing loss, heart disease, cognitive performance, mental health and sleep disturbance – to help educate medical and non medical people on the impacts of noise.

The researchers responsible for the review were members of the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) who convened to summarize the current findings on noise exposure and health. The team paid special attention to studies that have been published in the last five years in the areas of otolaryngology, cardiovascular and sleep medicine, psychology and even hospital medicine to get a sense of the current evidence on noise.

Medicine knows that high noise levels cause hearing loss, the most common occupational disease in the U.S. with about 22 million workers exposed to hazardous noise levels as part of their job. Each year, an estimated $242 million is spent on compensating people for hearing loss disability related to the workplace.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

The Healthy Back Institute’s Back Pain Relief Journal

Jesse Cannone, co-founder of The Healthy Back Institute, has helped over 50,000 “lost cause” back pain sufferers finally get lasting pain relief. Now, he proclaims…

For 15 years their step-by-step system has helped over 50,000 people who’ve suffered from scoliosis … herniated discs … sciatica … arthritis of the spine … spinal stenosis … lower back pain … upper back pain and more…

It only takes a few minutes per day.

Click through to read their free report here today…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


How Noise Impact On Your Health Continued…

When it came to effects of noise that go beyond hearing loss, the study authors
feel that the impact all the noise we’re regularly exposed to is underestimated.
The World Health Organization estimates over 1 million disability adjusted life
years are lost to western European member states.

What’s more, the researchers uncovered evidence that long-term exposure to noise from the environment affects the cardiovascular system and has connections to hypertension, ischemic heart disease and even stroke. Numerous studies pointed out associations between noise in the environment and disturbances in sleep, a child’s thinking process and negative impact in hospitals for both the healing patients and working staff.

There is still much debate on what levels of noise are thought to be safe. More work with proper control groups could help enlighten everyone. Less noise would help all of us by leaving us less annoyed, making learning environments better for kids, improving sleep for kids and adults, as well as a possible lower incidence of heart disease, and in hospitals, improved patient outcomes and shorter stays.

To your good health,

Cutting Salt May Save Half A Million Lives

The number is impressive. As many as 500,000 American lives could be saved if we ate just a little bit less salt each day according to new research appearing in the journal of the American Heart Association, Hypertension. The study found that a slow decrease in the consumption of salt over a ten year period, ending up as a 40% reduction from where intake is today, would cut the risk of heart disease and high blood pressure, and prolong the lives of from 280,000 to 500,000 people. The study operated under the assumption that daily salt intake was lowered to 2,200 milligrams; most Americans take in 3,600 milligrams of sodium each day, more than double the recommended amount.

The study results clearly demonstrate the value of cutting the consumption of sodium according to Michael Jacobson who is executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a well-known consumer watchdog group. What makes this work so important is that there were three groups of researchers, each using different models and approaches to their computer simulations, who all came to the very same conclusion.

Cutting sodium intake prolongs health, saves lives.

The recommended amount of sodium intake – 1,500 milligrams a day – according to figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is far lower than the typical intake of 3,600 milligrams of sodium most of us get each day. Those who need to be especially careful about their sodium intake are people with high blood pressure, a condition that most of us have by the time we reach our later years.

The good news if you’re into flavor (and who isn’t?) is that you don’t have to remove the saltshaker from every table in America to achieve sodium reductions. Food makes need to reduce the amount of salt they are putting in the commercially prepared or pre-packaged foods sold in stores. These foods are the source of 80% of our sodium intake.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

1 Quick Technique To Burn More Fat

Here’s Your Free Presentation To Discover:

The 1 sneaky technique to trick our bodies to burn more fat…

How a unique, simple and quick NEW way of moving eliminates fat – Hint: it’s the exact opposite of boring cardio, but with no cardio at all…

How a tasty little dish eaten late at night actually boosted the most powerful fat loss hormone in our bodies while you sleep…

Click through here now to discover how to burn more fat quicker today…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Cutting Salt May Save Half A Million Lives Continued…

Working with the industry is key according to the study lead author Kirstin Bibbins-Domingo, Ph.D., M.D. who is an associate professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of California at San Francisco. Yet there seems little chance of that as industry spokesperson Morton Satin, science and research director at the Salt Institute, blasted the research as too narrow. He feels that too much focus over the last 30 years has been on high blood pressure, as if there were no other serious disease. Plus a low salt intake can be trouble for those with diabetes and some other conditions. He claims that the industry sells more salt during a winter snowstorm than they do to food makers the whole year through.

It’s certainly true that a healthy body does need a balance of sodium and water so that body systems work properly. Too much of either salt or water and you upset the balance. Too much salt causes your body to hold onto water, and this puts extra strain on your heart and blood vessels. In some this becomes or raises existing high blood pressure

Yet, look at what’s on supermarket shelves and you’ll quickly see that the U.S. food supply doesn’t make it easy to choose lower salt products so that we might get close to those recommended intake levels. We need more low salt options. We need to be more aware. In the meantime, reading labels, and taking care as you prepare foods are your best options for getting your intake to where it should be.

To your good health,

Exercises To Reduce Cholesterol

Trying to get those cholesterol numbers in line? Your doctor has probably told you that exercise is one thing you can do to get your numbers in the healthy range, but you probably still have a few questions. What kind of exercises to reduce cholesterol work best? How long should you do it? How often? And perhaps the most pressing question of all – how much impact can exercise have on cholesterol numbers?

So long as you’re exercising the right way, experts like Patrick McBride, MD, MPH, director of the preventive cardiology program and the cholesterol clinic at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, believe the answer to that last question is quite a lot. Being active on a regular basis affects your cholesterol levels in two beneficial ways…

- Helps to lower triglycerides that at high levels are associated with heart disease.

- Helps to raise levels of HDL (the good cholesterol) in your blood.

If you exercise regularly you can bring your triglycerides down by 30% to 40%, and bring up that HDL by 5 to 8 mg/dL. Notice we haven’t mentioned LDL (bad) cholesterol here. Unfortunately it appears exercise cannot bring this value down, unless you also loose a significant amount of weight. Your doctor has probably told you that being too heavy is known to increase the amount of LDL in your blood.

When it comes to what kind of exercise is best, experts stress it’s not so much the type of workout as it is how often you do it.

Where once doctors recommended only aerobic endurance workouts for cholesterol lowering, it turns out that a number of studies on resistance training have shown some powerful effects on cholesterol – especially if you do moderate strength training a lot – circuit training with 10 reps each station, with three cycles of the whole circuit – you can get some very respectable improvements in your cholesterol numbers.

Typically experts recommend a combination of exercise to get the most benefit to your cholesterol numbers…

- Aerobics get your heart rate up.

- Strength training builds muscle.

- Flexibility exercise to keep you limber.

And how intense should those workouts be?

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Announcing: Doctor Approved Store Cupboard Remedies that Really Work…

Do you buy over the counter drugs?

Stop right now and don’t waste any more money.

Did you know that you can easily treat illness without side effects, using only natural herbs, vitamins and nutrients?

Charles Silverman N.D. Certified Naturopathic and Herbalist Doctor has taken his 18 years research and experience and condensed it into a home remedy encyclopeida of the most powerful, and more importantly proven, home remedies.

You can eliminate the Flu virus, boost your immune system, and recover faster from colds using these doctor-approved home remedies…

As well as sleep better, look younger and treat any skin problem with your own skin care home remedies and recipes.

Click through now to discover the “hidden” kitchen cupboard cures – proven by clinical trials.
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Best Exercises To Control Your Cholesterol… Continued…

While some fitness regimens call for you to “feel the burn”, working to bring cholesterol numbers down isn’t one of those. Frequency and the amount of time you spend exercising are what count more in this case. You’ll want to go for moderate intensity of a good long duration – at least a half hour of exercise five to six days each week. Forget getting your heart rate in some “target zone” instead shoot for low resistance and a nice long, 45-minute workout.

Remember, true fitness means that you are strong, flexible and have endurance – something you get from regular workouts like the type described above. All exercise is good exercise and has incredible benefits (not just to cholesterol levels) for your body. Engaging in exercises to reduce cholesterol will also help your heart, your blood pressure, improve diabetes and bring down your risk of heart attack or devastating stroke.

Links Between A Diet High In Salt And High Blood Pressure

Are you sure you want those chips? Regularly eating a diet high in salt over even just a few years might do enough damage to your blood vessels to leave you with high blood pressure according to a new study.

The work appears in the online edition of Circulation and finds that eating more salt than you should over the long run likely affects the lining of blood vessels, and this ups the risk that you’ll develop high blood pressure.

The notion that salt has an impact on whether you get high blood pressure is still controversial. One study appearing in 2011 in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that less sodium in urine was linked with more heart disease deaths.

The researchers for this latest work kept track of the salt intake for 5,556 men and women from the Netherlands for just about 6 years. The subjects, all white, were free of high blood pressure at the start of the study.

By looking at 24-hour urine samples that were collected over several years, the team noted how much uric acid and albumin was in the samples – both are markers for blood vessel damage. They could also keep track of sodium intake.

The researchers, led by Dr. John Forman who is assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, found that over time those who took in the most sodium had higher levels of both uric acid and albumin in their urine. The higher the levels in the urine, the more likely these subjects were to develop high blood pressure, especially if they kept on eating the high sodium way. It may be that those who have markers for blood vessel damage are even more negatively impacted by a high salt diet than the rest of us.

By study’s end there had been 878 new cases of high blood pressure. Those who ate the most sodium (6,200 mg a day) were 21% more likely to be diagnosed with high blood pressure than those taking in the least (2,200 mg a day).

If you had high uric acid and albumin levels and ate lots of salt, your chance of high blood pressure rose to 86%. The work showed an association between markers of damage to blood vessels and high blood pressure, not a cause and affect relationship.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Overweight? Shocking Proof that it may not be your fault

99% of the “professional” weight loss techniques are wrong – ending up with you actually putting on weight rather than losing it.

Find out why counting calories is bad for you and can sabotage your dieting efforts.

Discover a new way to effortlessly shed unwanted pounds and drop 9 lbs. every 11 days.

This diet is called the “Idiot Proof Diet” because it’s all worked out for you and there’s no need for calorie counting or label reading.

Click through to find out how you can be slimmer with this innovative new weight loss system…

Click through now to discover how to drop 9lbs every 11 days…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Salty Diets Over The Long Term Tied To High Blood Pressure… Continued…

In case you’re wondering, 2,200 milligrams of salt is about one teaspoon. Experts advise limiting your sodium intake to under 2,300 mg per day, 1,500 mg day if you are black, over 50 or have a chronic disease.

How might salt do such damage to blood vessels isn’t fully understood as yet. It may be that exposure to sodium brings progressive changes in the lining that, over time, cannot be reversed. Once you have high blood pressure, cutting salt won’t be enough to bring your numbers down.

Keep in mind that of the sodium we take in each day comes not just from the salt shaker, far more comes from processed foods. A cup of soup or single serve frozen dinner can bring as much as 1,000 milligrams of sodium in a single portion. You’re best bet to prevent high blood pressure from being a part of your life is enjoying everything in moderation, and keeping a watchful eye on other cardiovascular risks. Stay away from a diet high in salt. Don’t smoke. Keep your weight under control, your cholesterol down and your blood pressure managed.

Food That Lowers Blood Pressure

Fascinating findings on food that lowers blood pressure. The compound isoflavones, found in foods like soy milk, green tea, tofu and peanuts, might just help bring down blood pressure in younger adults according to new research. They may offer particular benefit to black adults, a group where nearly 42% are believed to have high blood pressure. The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology 2012 annual meeting in Chicago.

To conduct the research, the team analyzed data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study on over 5,000 subjects. The study found that those who consumed the highest amounts (over 2.5 milligrams) of isoflavones a day had an average 5.5 mmHg lower systolic (top number) blood pressure than those who took in the least (under 0.33 milligrams) isoflavones a day.

To put the numbers to a practical application, an 8-ounce glass of soy milk brings 22 milligrams of isoflavones; 100 grams of roasted soybeans has 130 milligrams of isoflavones. The blood pressure benefit appears to come from even moderate amounts of intake of isoflavones for the young, both black and white adults. This is the first research to show a particular benefit for African Americans who are known to get high blood pressure more often, at an earlier age and end with more severe organ damage as a result.

It may be that eating some soy protein, along with a DASH diet, could bring as much as a 10 mmHg drop in the systolic (top) blood pressure for those who have yet to be diagnosed with high blood pressure. This dramatically improves their chances of not only getting high blood pressure but also suffering the other damaging effects.

Today almost one in three adults in the U.S. has high blood pressure, a condition known as the “silent” killer because it typically has no outward signs or symptoms. It can exist for years without you knowing, but all the while doing damage not only to your heart, but to blood vessels, your kidneys and other areas of the body as well.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Have You Seen Linda Allen’s new Candida System yet? It’s called “Yeast Infection No More”

I’ve read the whole thing (all 150 pages) and there’s some great information in there about how to naturally and permanently eliminate your yeast infection without drugs, creams or any kind of gimmicks. I highly recommend it – it’s very honest and straightforward without all the hype and b.s. you see all over the net these days.

Click Through Now and Discover How to Get Rid of Yeast Infections Once and For All…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Eating These Foods Might Bring Down Blood Pressure… Continued…

Even more startling are the figures that suggest that only one third of American who know they have high blood pressure have it under control. Many more do not.

Another expert, Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of women and heart disease at Lenox Hill Hospital, who wasn’t involved in the current research, supports the idea that isoflavones are good for our hearts. They dilate the blood vessels by producing enzymes that then create nitric oxide. This helps to widen blood vessels and that brings down blood pressure.

Your best bet if the risk of high blood pressure is a concern for you is to try adding a moderate amount of soy foods into your already well balanced diet. Be sure you know your blood pressure numbers – not having them checked is no protection.

For those diagnosed with high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about adding soy foods to your diet as they may well help (along with your low salt DASH eating plan) in reducing your need for blood pressure lowering drugs.

In the meantime, watch for more trials on food that lowers blood pressure to help clarify the association between isoflavones and blood pressure readings.

Effects Of Fructose On Health

You’ve heard that sweetened beverages have been associated with a higher risk of high blood pressure, but a new U.S. study appearing in the Journal of General Internal Medicine on the effects of fructose suggests that fruit sugar might not be at fault.

Experts followed over 200,000 adults for 38 years and saw that regularly drinking sweetened beverages (either with fruit sugars or artificial sweeteners) was linked to a rise of almost 13% in the risk of being diagnosed with high blood pressure. Those carbonated and cola options were most strongly associated with a risk of high blood pressure, but surprisingly fruit sugar (fructose), didn’t stand out.

Fructose is a simple sugar, a natural part of honey as well as fruits, veggies and their juices. It’s the reason foods and drinks have such a sweet taste. And while a little bit is fine, and might just help the body process sugar properly, too much fructose all at once appears to overwhelm the body’s ability to process it. Estimates suggest that as much as 10% of the modern diet comes from fructose – a far larger percentage than ever before.

Fructose can’t be singled out as a contributor to risk of hypertension says study lead author Lisa Cohen, a researcher at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Even though earlier work has implicated fructose as a factor in high blood pressure, Cohen believes these projects have only taken a snapshot in time and couldn’t tell which came first, high blood pressure or love for sweet drinks.

She and her colleagues examined data from three very large studies that involved just about 224,000 healthcare workers who had their diet and health status tracked for anywhere from 16 to 38 years. None of the subjects had been diagnosed with high blood pressure at the start of the study.

As time passed, those who drank at least one sugar sweetened drink a day were shown to have a 13% higher risk of high blood pressure compared to those who drank these beverages far less often – once a month or even less.

Those who drank at least one artificially sweetened drink each day had a 14% higher risk of developing high blood pressure when compared to those who drank few (or none) of these types of drinks.

To see if the fructose was responsible, the team looked at the subjects who had high levels of fructose in their diets that they got from other sources, most often through eating whole fruits. For those who got 15% of their calories from fructose sources besides drinks, the risk of high blood pressure was either lower (or the same) as those who didn’t eat much fructose at all. So if fructose were a contributor to high blood pressure, then eating lots of fructose rich foods should also increase your risk.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Have You Seen Linda Allen’s new Candida System yet? It’s called “Yeast Infection No More”

I’ve read the whole thing (all 150 pages) and there’s some great information in there about how to naturally and permanently eliminate your yeast infection without drugs, creams or any kind of gimmicks. I highly recommend it – it’s very honest and straightforward without all the hype and b.s. you see all over the net these days.

Click Through Now and Discover How to Get Rid of Yeast Infections Once and For All…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Fruit Sugar Is Not The “Bad Guy”… Continued…

The team did account for factors other than the effects of fructose in both diet and lifestyle that might impact high blood pressure risk. They considered family history of high blood pressure, overall diet quality, the intake of alcohol, fats, fiber and some vitamins, as well as the smoking status, how active participants were, and use of both contraceptives and nonprescription pain medications. The team also adjusted for weight, and the changes to this number over the study period. Cohen’s team even looked at caffeine, and saw nothing.

The CDC estimates that about 30 of every 100 U.S. adults have high blood pressure. Doctors recognize that you can have high blood pressure for years, without symptoms, so it’s important to know your numbers. If they are higher than they should be (over 120/80), you need to work with your healthcare team to get those numbers under control.

Surprising High Blood Pressure Risk Factors

Worried about stroke risk? Here’s some important news on high blood pressure risk factors. Keeping your blood pressure numbers under control is one of the best things you can do to bring down your risk of dangerous, debilitating stroke, still the fourth leading cause of death in America.

Amazing that even today, estimates suggest that every 40 seconds someone in the United States suffers a stroke. Building awareness of this often overlooked danger is the mission of the American Heat Association and American Stroke Association, and why they dubbed May 2012 American Stroke Month.

The concern for doctors is that many of us don’t realize we’re at risk for high blood pressure and stroke. Usually without any outward symptoms, high blood pressure does damage to the critical organs of your body silently, over time.

Here are the major things that put you at risk for high blood pressure, three that you cannot change…

- Family history – if you have a parent or close blood relative with high blood pressure, you’re at risk. You can pass this risk to your own children. You should try to learn all you can about your family medical history so that you’re aware of your own risks for diseases. Also, regular blood pressure checks help you know where you stand.

- Getting older - as the years pass we are all at higher risk of high blood pressure and heart disease. This happens because blood vessels naturally lose their flexibility with age, and this causes more pressure to be put on the cardiovascular system as a whole.

- Your gender - men are more likely to have high blood pressure numbers until age 45, between 45 to 50 and then again from 55 to 64 years, the risk for hypertension is almost the same for both sexes. After age 64, women become the more likely to have high blood pressure than men of the same age.

And others that, thankfully, you can do something about…

- Inactivity - too much sitting (at your desk or couch) ups your risk of high blood pressure and gaining weight. Getting regular exercise (moderate to vigorously intense), as many days of the week as you can, is a natural, side effect free way to strengthen your body and bring blood pressure numbers in line. Being active is good for both your heart and circulation.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

Announcing: Doctor Approved Store Cupboard Remedies that Really Work…

Do you buy over the counter drugs?

Stop right now and don’t waste any more money.

Did you know that you can easily treat illness without side effects, using only natural herbs, vitamins and nutrients?

Charles Silverman N.D. Certified Naturopathic and Herbalist Doctor has taken his 18 years research and experience and condensed it into a home remedy encyclopeida of the most powerful, and more importantly proven, home remedies.

You can eliminate the Flu virus, boost your immune system, and recover faster from colds using these doctor-approved home remedies…

As well as sleep better, look younger and treat any skin problem with your own skin care home remedies and recipes.

Click through now to discover the “hidden” kitchen cupboard cures – proven by clinical trials.
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Stroke News: Surprising Dangerous High Blood Pressure Risks… Continued…

- Too much salt – salt keeps extra fluid in the body, which can add to the burden already placed on the heart and thus increasing the risk of high blood pressure. A diet that’s full of essential nutrients that come from a variety of foods is best. Experts recommend that adults keep sodium intake to less than 1,500 milligrams a day.

- Too much alcohol - drinking heavily and regularly can bring a dramatic rise in blood pressure and also be the cause of dangerous heart failure, devastating stroke and even irregular heartbeat. If you do drink alcohol, limit yourself to no more than one drink a day for women, two a day for men.

- Being overweight/obese - is a strain to many body systems – just imagine the effort required by your heart to pump blood through all that fat and you can see why being too heavy is a problem. If your BMI falls between 25.0 and 30.0 you are carrying too much weight and need to lose. The good news? Even a small weight loss of 10 or 20 pounds can bring a significant improvement in blood pressure readings.

By doing what you can to reduce your high blood pressure risk factors, you do the best thing possible to cut your risk of having a stroke and bringing those serious, lasting consequences into your life and the lives of those you love.

Lower Blood Pressure With Exercise

Welcome news to the many who live with high blood pressure. Exercise has been shown to cut the risk of death in a recent 12-year study presented at the World Congress of Cardiology 2012. What’s more, the team also found that inactivity increased the risk of death, as potent a threat as an increase in blood pressure readings by 40 to 50 points. Fortunately, you can address this risk lower blood pressure with exercise.

You’ve probably heard high blood pressure described as the “silent killer”, and it’s a good name. People can have high blood pressure for years, without symptoms or even knowing anything is wrong, yet the condition quietly does its damage while increasing the chances of heart attack or devastating stroke. This is one of the reasons medical professionals encourage annual exams – once a problem like high blood pressure is identified, it can be treated so that you stay healthier.

The reason that’s important is because high blood pressure is known to be one of the preventable risks for early death from cardiovascular disease the world over. Cardiovascular disease risk goes up dramatically as those blood pressure numbers rise. In fact, high blood pressure contributes to almost half of all diagnoses of heart disease – with risk increasing for every 10 point rise in diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure.

This most recent research is the first to quantify the impact of activity on those with high blood pressure, and included over 434,000 subjects in Taiwan. Of these, 54% were considered inactive, 22% were classified as having low activity levels, another 24% were found to have moderate to even high levels of activity. The risk of death from all things (specifically cardiovascular disease) was higher for those subjects who were inactive compared to those who were active, no matter what their blood pressure readings were.

Continues below…


*Highly Recommended*

The “secret” to losing belly fat…

You’ve been lied to. Lied to by the fitness magazines, lied to by the government and lied to by the food industry.

Lies such as…

-> You need to eat “low calorie” to lose fat
-> You should do long, slow cardio to put your body in the “fat burning zone”
-> You should eat plenty of whole grains to stay healthy and lean
-> Losing fat is a slow & steady process

Well Vic Magary who is one of the go to fat loss experts just put up a video exposing all of these myths…

Vic is a former Army soldier and he knows what works and what doesn’t – and spills all of his biggest secrets in the video…

Click through now and check out this free video and discover the secret to losing stubborn belly fat…
*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


Patients with High Blood Pressure Live Longer With Exercise… Continued…

Getting those blood pressure numbers down where they should be in order to prevent heart disease is the goal of all doctors agrees study author C.P. Wen, from the Institute of Population Health Science a part of Taiwan’s National Health Research Institute. Wen suggests that doctors and patients not focus so much on blood pressure numbers, but rather the findings of this study should encourage physicians to discuss how important being active is as a means to manage both heart disease and risk of death.

It’s well known that those who are active live longer and feel better. And all it takes is 30 minutes of moderately intense activity as many days of the week as possible – at least 5 for starters. To be successful in lowering blood pressure with exercise over the long term you need to find the right workout – an activity that you enjoy or that you can do with a supportive friend. And, if it’s been a while since you were active on a regular basis, talk to your doctor first, then start slow and build in small steps. Before long you’ll be amazed at how far you’ve come and how great you feel.