Category Archives: Alzheimers

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The Benefits Of Playing A Musical Instrument At Any Age

Having the ability to play an instrument is a great gift; it also appears to improve your cognitive health in your later years, even if you’ve stopped playing according to a study in the journal Neuropsychology. We know music relieves stress and everyone recognizes that stress is terrible for both your physical and mental health. Beyond this, there’s plenty of science that supports the idea of music being good for you and there’s increasing interest among the medical community in keeping the brain as healthy and strong as the body.

The latest research in the area of music and the brain was conducted at the University of Kansas Medical Center and included 70 healthy (with similar fitness/education levels, and free of Alzheimer’s disease) adults who’d been recruited to participate. The subjects were from 60 to 83 years old and were broken into groups based on levels of musical experience from no musical training, one to nine years of music lessons, or at last 10 years studying a musical instrument.

Over half the subjects who had studied music were piano players, another quarter played woodwind instruments and the final quarter played string instruments, percussion or brass. The subjects were given a few cognitive tests, and not surprisingly, the musicians of the group performed better on these tests than those who had never studied or didn’t know how to read music.

When compared to the non-musicians of the study, those who had lots (10 years) of musical training had far higher scores on the cognitive testing. The benefits of musical training were still evident even in those who had stopped playing.

Intriguing that the brain function the team was measuring tends to go down with age.

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Fact: Poor Sleep Increases The Risk of Death/ Disease

Ever lain awake at night and counted the hours till dawn? Isn’t frustrating to be in bed and be unable to sleep?

With around 18 million prescriptions written every year for expensive sleeping pills…

…it’s clear that there’s a national epidemic.

So, what do doctors do when they can’t sleep?

Here’s the answer.

Learn how a retired M.D. Laney Chouest from New Orleans broke his 5-year addiction to Ambien, and now sleeps peacefully without medication.

Also, discover how a Licensed Psychologist, Sharon Stein McNamara, Ed.D.fromMinnesota broke her insomnia cycle.

Click through today to discover the 7 mistakes that are killing your sleep, and how overcome them…
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The Benefits Of Playing A Musical Instrument At Any Age Continued…

It may be that musical ability or learning stays with you and acts as a challenging mental activity that makes your brain sharper, more able to deal with the changes of aging. Learning an instrument takes years of study and practice, and might just create alternative connections in the brain that help to make up for cognitive declines that happen naturally as we get older.

But if you’re older, you can still get a number of health benefits from starting an instrument. Making music can lower your blood pressure, slow your heart rate, ease stress as well as anxiety and depression. There’s also more evidence than before that making music helps the immune response of the body.

As we’ve mentioned here recently, music has been used by therapists to help patients with dementia feel better. Music is familiar, evoking comfortable, happier memories. Music also has a close relationship with our unconscious emotions. It’s engaging and emotionally powerful and can have strong effects on the way we think, how we feel and even our physiology.

What’s great is that anyone, of any age or ability, can make music and get the benefit. You don’t have to be good or be a kid to take lessons. Musical study makes your brain work and this may be just the thing to help address the challenges of aging.

To your good health,

Bellezza87 / Pixabay

Which Coffee Is Good For You?

Here’s a bit of fascinating news for coffee drinkers. We love it for the taste, and the feelings of being more alert we get. New research has found that, surprisingly, coffee can also be good for the heart. Who would have thought it? We all know there are addictive properties to the caffeine in coffee, but the jump-start it gives our bodies makes that easy to ignore. Not many who drink coffee on a daily (hourly?) basis realize there may in fact be health benefits to that macchiato, cappuccino, flat white, long black, latte, espresso you enjoy.

There has been research over the years showing both positive, and negative, effects on the body after drinking coffee. This might be explained by the lack of consistency in the coffee we’re all drinking. There are different roasts, species and varieties of coffee beans and all of them have different amounts of caffeine and other components. There’s also the impact of adding sugar, sugar syrups, cream or milk as well as the sizes of the cups that become a part of the equation.

Of late there’s been a lot of change in the debate over if coffee is good or bad for you. A Harvard School of Public Health study has found no link between coffee and mortality. Even if you drink up to six cups a day, there’s no higher risk of death from any cause. This fits into the research picture that seems to be emerging over the past few years.

Coffee is one of the complex flavor profiles there is; it has double the flavor range of many wines. The chemical structure of coffee actually provides you more flavors, and it’s loaded with caffeine, which wakes you up and has you ready to go. Experts do warn about drinking too much, an 8-ounce (225ml w/ 100mg of caffeine) cup was used in the Harvard study, not the 16-ounce (450ml w/ 330mg of caffeine) one you get in a large coffee at a coffee shop.

Coffee has also been shown to have no impact on the many forms of arterial cardiovascular disease, arrhythmia or heart insufficiency. There’s even an association between coffee drinking and a reduction in the incidence of both diabetes and liver disease. There may be protection for Parkinson’s disease and benefits to mental health due to the social interaction of getting and drinking the beverage. Unlike alcohol that leaves people lethargic, coffee switches us on.

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The Healthy Back Institute’s Back Pain Relief Journal

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Which Coffee Is Good For You? Continued…

Other studies have found some beneficial substances in coffee, most recently in Greek style coffee. Research appearing in the Vascular Medicine Journal found that the coffee intake of elderly subjects on the Greek island of Ikaria was associated with a drop in one risk factor for heart disease. Greek coffee is brewed in a stovetop pot (briki) and is rather strong, with lots of heavy foam and can be brewed along with sugar to increase the sweetness. It’s served with a glass of water.

This type of coffee has been found to have high amounts of some important anti-inflammatory compounds. Brewed coffee has the most caffeine at 135mg per 8 ounces, while filtered coffee has 112mg of caffeine and percolated just 74mg of caffeine for the same 8 ounce serving. Seemingly how your coffee is brewed impacts the substances in the cup.

The good news on coffee goes further than that. The drink has been identified as one that’s a natural source of antioxidants, those helpful little substances that stop molecules from oxidizing and producing dangerous free radicals. There is also research to support women who drink two (or more) cups of coffee a day being less apt to have symptoms of depression than those who don’t drink this much coffee.

So, there’s a lot to learn. Enjoy your coffee, but as in all things, use moderation. It should not be your primary source of fluids.

To your good health,

Bellezza87 / Pixabay

More Positive Research On Caffeine And Alzheimer’s

Finally, caffeine gets some good press. A team of French and German scientists have found that caffeine has a positive effect on tau deposits, a well known sign of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain, publishing their work just recently in the journal Neurobiology of Aging. It appears that giving regular doses of caffeine to mice bred to have tau proteins in their brains held off memory decline when compared to control mice. Such findings may well pave the way for a new class of medications to treat (or perhaps prevent) Alzheimer’s disease.

The two universally recognized physical signs of Alzheimer’s disease are deposits of tau protein (clogging the inside of brain cells) and plaques of amyloid protein (between brain cells). It’s hard to see these things in a living brain, which is why mice are used as research subjects in this area.

Science knows that Alzheimer’s causes terrible problems with the metabolism in the cells of the brain; they end up not working, losing connections with each other and over time dying off. This gradual deterioration is what causes the memory failure, trouble doing daily tasks, changes in personality and other symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, a condition that’s a fact of life for an estimated 5 million Americans, with numbers expected to rise dramatically in the coming decades, as the population ages.

For the most recent study, the team looked at the effect of persistent, regular intake of caffeine on mice who had been bred to have tau deposits… similar to what might been seen in human subjects. The mice were given caffeine in their water, and a control group was not given the substance in their drinking water. Turns out the tau mice who were chronic caffeine drinkers didn’t develop the spatial memory impairments that researchers saw in the control group of mice.

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WARNING: The truth about Moles, Warts and Skintags…

There are so many “scare” stories that it’s sometimes hard to know what to believe. Which is why this is so timely…

Find out how you, too, can:

- Have freedom from the pain and irritation of your unsightly moles, warts, or skin tags

- Naturally REMOVE moles, warts, or skin tags at the root without any scarring

- Enjoy having clear skin, free from unsightly and painful moles, warts or skin tags

Click through now to discover safe, painless and effective ways to permanently remove moles, warts or skin tags in three days…
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More Positive Research On Caffeine And Alzheimer’s Continued…

What’s more, the chemistry of the tau proteins in the hippocampus (involved in rodent memory) was distinctly different in the mice drinking caffeine. Caffeine also appears to reduce other pro inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus of the brain. These findings add weight to the idea that caffeine intake is helpful in mice that develop the tau deposits like those in humans. Watch for future medications to come from these most intriguing findings.

Earlier work on Alzheimer’s has shown regular, moderate caffeine intake prevents declining memory in older adults and cuts the risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Some researchers have gone one step further and shown how intake of caffeine slows memory decline in mice that have been bred to develop the Alzheimer’s hallmark amyloid plaques. It wasn’t until this latest study on tau deposits that mice bred for the other hallmark physical symptom of disease showed a positive response to caffeine.

The risks of Alzheimer’s increase with age, family history, some genetic factors, a history of head trauma, hypertension at midlife, being diabetic or obese or having high cholesterol. We also know that a healthy, balanced diet and other lifestyle changes may impact that risk. Drinking coffee, or another caffeinated drink, over a lifetime appears to be beneficial, particularly to older adults or in the period before disease symptoms appear – a simple prevention strategy you might want to consider.

geralt / Pixabay

7 Simple Signs Of Health Troubles

Turns out, you don’t need tarot cards or a crystal ball to predict the future… you can do this for yourself by relying on the observations of your own five senses. You might be surprised to learn that many health problems often begin with a physical change you might not think is anything to be concerned about, something so subtle you might not notice it at first. Yet these changes can be warning signs you’ll want to heed.

One of the most surprising links between the senses and chronic disease comes in the form of hearing loss. Hearing loss is more likely in those who have diabetes. The higher than normal blood sugar may also do some damage to the blood vessels in the ears themselves. If you notice a decline in hearing, have a full hearing evaluation, as well as a physical and blood work, to see where you stand.

Vision changes can be an early signal of cognitive decline. The veins in your eyes are very much the same as the ones in your brain, so larger veins in your eyes could indicate a decline in the health of your brain years before any signs appear. Your eye doctor will be able to examine you for this.

If your sense of smell is slipping, this has been shown to be a potential early sign of Alzheimer’s disease according to the latest studies in the area. The changes that come in smell may appear much sooner than those that happen I the rest of the brain. If you’ve noticed a decline earlier than age 70, talk with your doctor.

Bad breath is a well-known (and despised) sign of gum disease, but this unfortunate problem can also be linked to erectile
dysfunction.
Brush and floss daily and make sure you have regular dental exams and cleanings every year. If it persist despite your good dental care, talk with your doctor to look for other causes.

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WARNING: The truth about Moles, Warts and Skintags…

There are so many “scare” stories that it’s sometimes hard to know what to believe. Which is why this is so timely…

Find out how you, too, can:

- Have freedom from the pain and irritation of your unsightly moles, warts, or skin tags

- Naturally REMOVE moles, warts, or skin tags at the root without any scarring

- Enjoy having clear skin, free from unsightly and painful moles, warts or skin tags

Click through now to discover safe, painless and effective ways to permanently remove moles, warts or skin tags in three days…
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7 Simple Signs Of Health Troubles Continued…

Your own reflection can tell you a lot about what’s going on inside your body. Those who look older than their age, with 3 to 4 visible signs of aging, have a higher chance of heart issues later on according to research. If you’re concerned by looking older, ask your doctor to check for any other heart disease risk factions and remember that you can change your risk by the choices you make going forward.

Your hairline can give clues to thyroid issues, and while thyroid issues affect many hormones in the body, one of the most visible is the hormone that is linked to hair growth. You might see your hair getting dry or coarse before it begins to fall out, you might also notice thinning of your eyebrows. Talk with your doctor about your concerns and have blood work done to check for thyroid hormones.

Smooth, spot free fingernails are a sign of good health. If yours have redness underneath this could be an early sign of lupus. You may also notice swelling and puffiness at the base of your nails or a rash on the backs of your hands and fingers.

If you have concerns about these, or any symptoms you are experiencing, talk to your own doctor. An honest discussion and careful evaluation by a trained professional will reassure you, and perhaps set you on the path to better health by making healthy choices about what you eat, and how active you are. Early intervention is also incredibly beneficial, often keeping you healthier, longer than you might be otherwise.

To your good health,

cocoparisienne / Pixabay

News On Low Vitamin D Levels And Alzheimer’s Risk

Researchers agree that there’s a connection between vitamin D and the workings of your brain – they’ve even found receptors for the nutrient in many parts of the brain. Now there’s word on vitamin D and Alzheimer’s risk via a study in the journal Neurology, the largest yet, that finds an association between low levels of vitamin D and dementia. Older people who have too little of the sunshine vitamin in their bloodstream may also have two times the risk of developing devastating Alzheimer’s disease as older people who have enough of the vitamin in their body. Alzheimer’s is the most common type of dementia and affects almost 5 million Americans.

Beyond what it does in the brain, vitamin D is needed to maintain healthy bones, to moderate cell growth, and help with immune function and inflammation. You can get this most essential nutrient from a very few food (fatty fish like salmon, turn or mackerel, milk, eggs, cheese) sources, through your skin during sunscreen free exposure to sunlight, or by taking supplements.

The latest research involved over 1,600 healthy adults over the age of 65 who were taking part in the U.S. Cardiovascular Health Study during 1992-1993 and 1999. Samples of their blood were collected at the beginning of the study, and their mental status was assessed about six years later. During the study, 102 cases of Alzheimer’s were diagnosed in the subject pool. The team saw that those who had low levels of vitamin D were about 1.7 times more likely to have Alzheimer’s, and those with severely low (50 nanomoles per liter) levels were 2.2 times more likely to be diagnosed with the disease. These findings are similar to those from other, smaller projects.

How does vitamin D help? Experts think that the vitamin may clear plaques in the brain that are associated with dementia. This has already been shown in the laboratory.

Still these findings are not enough to have your doctor telling you to take vitamin D supplements in order to protect you from Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia. Clinical trials are the next step in the process. Changes in diet, or simply getting out in the sun, may be enough, but no one can be sure. Increasing vitamin D levels may only be part of the Alzheimer’s prevention picture.

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WARNING: The truth about Moles, Warts and Skintags…

There are so many “scare” stories that it’s sometimes hard to know what to believe. Which is why this is so timely…

Find out how you, too, can:

- Have freedom from the pain and irritation of your unsightly moles, warts, or skin tags

- Naturally REMOVE moles, warts, or skin tags at the root without any scarring

- Enjoy having clear skin, free from unsightly and painful moles, warts or skin tags

Click through now to discover safe, painless and effective ways to permanently remove moles, warts or skin tags in three days…
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News On Low Vitamin D Levels And Alzheimer’s Risk Continued…

In the meantime, it’s important for all of us to try to stick to a brain healthy (the same as a heart healthy) diet that includes lots of good tasting, good-for-you foods, including those low in saturated fats and cholesterol. Also, being regularly active and doing all you can to keep your blood pressure under control are important strategies in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

Today experts know that you’re more likely to get Alzheimer’s disease if…

- you’re over 65,

- you have a family history (parent or sibling) with the disease,

- you carry genes that are involved with developing Alzheimer’s,

- you’ve had a serious head injury, or repeat injuries,

- you’re black or Hispanic,

- you have other health problems (high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol), or

- you’ve ever had a stroke.

All these up the chances of Alzheimer’s disease; but by no means guarantee you will be affected. What science doesn’t know is what causes some people to develop the plaques and tangles of this disease while others remain unaffected. The condition is likely brought on by many different factors that work together, not any one cause.

To your good health,

PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

What’s Behind Your Memory Loss

Memory loss affects everyone at some point. Sometimes this is occasional forgetfulness… where you put the keys, why you left a room or the date of an appointment. These types of lapses are very common. But when memory loss begins to cause problems in everyday life, you’ll want to get to the bottom of an issue that’s just as distressing to you as it is to those around you.

Here are the more common reasons behind memory loss in adults.

Medications, both prescription and over the counter can cause problems with your memory. Some known culprits include antidepressants, antihistamines, antianxiety meds, muscle relaxants, tranquilizers, sleeping pills and pain medications, especially
those given after a surgical procedure.

Alcohol, tobacco or drugs are linked to loss of memory. For a long time now, we all have known that too much alcohol can impact memory. Smoking hurts memory by cutting the amount of oxygen that gets to the brain – studies show that smokers have trouble with putting names and faces together. Illegal drugs change chemicals
in the brain that make it hard to bring memories to the surface.

Sleep deprivation leads to fatigue, and this interferes with the brain’s ability to consolidate and bring back information. Experts tell us that both the quality and quantity of sleep are vital to how well memory functions.

Depression and stress make it hard to pay attention, to focus and this can impact memory. Stress also gets in the way of concentrating, and the ability to remember suffers. Stress from an emotional trauma can also bring on memory loss.

Nutrient deficiency in vitamins like B1 and B12 can impact memory.

Head injury from a serious blow to the head (as the result of an accident or sports related injury) can hurt the brain and cause both short and log term loss of memory. As you heal the memory may return.

Continues below…


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WARNING: The truth about Moles, Warts and Skintags…

There are so many “scare” stories that it’s sometimes hard to know
what to believe. Which is why this is so timely…

Find out how you, too, can:

- Have freedom from the pain and irritation of your unsightly moles, warts, or skin tags

- Naturally REMOVE moles, warts, or skin tags at the root without any scarring

- Enjoy having clear skin, free from unsightly and painful moles,
warts or skin tags

Click through now to discover safe, painless and effective ways to permanently remove moles, warts or skin tags in three days…

*Disclosure: compensated affiliate*


What’s Behind Your Memory Loss Continued…

Stroke happens when the blood supply to the brain is stopped due to a blockage or a leak in a vessel into the brain. Often the loss is to short-term memory,
while long term memories stay vivid and intact.

Dementia is the progressive loss of memory and other thinking areas that’s severe enough to interfere with daily life. There are many reasons for dementia (blood vessel disease, drug/alcohol abuse, damage to the brain), the one we all know is Alzheimer’s disease.

- Other reasons including an underactive (or overactive) thyroid gland, or an infection like HIV, tuberculosis or syphilis, known to affect the brain.

It is highly likely that your memory loss comes as the result of one of these causes. Only by working closely with your own healthcare team can you figure out what’s going on and get the support and early intervention you need. By doing this now, you are taking an active part in your own health and well being, today and in the future.

Some things that can help support a flagging memory are lists in the same place, written instructions/cautions, special appliance shutoff devices, frequent reminders and a good deal of support. Being patient and flexible, along with a healthy sense of humor will be important skills to master as you move forward.

To your good health,

Aquilatin / Pixabay

Reading: Good For Your Brain And Body

If you love to read, here’s some news that will make your passion even stronger – the more you read, the healthier you are. Research is proving, again and again, that reading is very good for us, Stories have a beginning, middle and end, which encourages our brains to think in a logical sequence, giving muscle to your mind and memory, helping your brain because of the good mental workout called for when you open a book.

In an age of Twitter and other social media that cater to short attention spans, you might think the novel has been replaced. Not so. Reading a novel (or other nonfiction material, like this article) call for concentration over longer time periods. When you get “lost” in a good story or engaging content, science has actually found that parts of the brain used to process experiences are activated, and this builds new neural pathways.

It might surprise you to learn more about other ways that reading a good book can have an impact on your brain and your whole body as well.

1. Reading works your intelligence, calling for lots of concentration and imagination, as opposed to sitting and absorbing what’s coming at us. Having the chance to pause, reflect and absorb sharpens your intelligence by challenging the whole neural circuit for reading. Books may just be vitamins for the brain.

2. Reading eases stress. It’s true, when you read; you tune out the world and pay more attention to the words, the characters and story unfolding before you. Your brain is actively engaged in something that calls for your full, undivided attention. So you’re not focusing on outside stressors. One study finds that just 6 minutes a day of reading can cut your stress by an amazing 68%. It’s the distraction that eases the muscle tension and heart/circulatory system.

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Fact: Poor Sleep Increases The Risk of Death/ Disease

Ever lain awake at night and counted the hours till dawn? Isn’t frustrating to be in bed and be unable to sleep?

With around 18 million prescriptions written every year for expensive sleeping pills…

…it’s clear that there’s a national epidemic.

So, what do doctors do when they can’t sleep?

Here’s the answer.

Click
through today to discover the 7 mistakes that are killing your sleep, and
how overcome them…

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Reading: Good For Your Brain And Body Continued…

3. Reading can help prevent aging of the brain and Alzheimer’s diseaseReading
can help prevent aging of the brain and Alzheimer’s disease. New research has
found that older people who read regularly are 2.5 times less apt to be diagnosed
with this terrible disease. When you challenge the brain with new things it helps
your informational processing stay stronger, more in shape. Some claim such practices
may even help reshape brain circuitry so it’s more adaptable in terms of mental
functions.

4. Reading fiction improves your social skills. The social experiences in a novel might just engage the same social thinking processes in the real world. Exposure to fictional characters might be able to stimulate the empathic ability because you became immersed in a character in a novel. When social skills get better so does self-confidence.

Experts believe that so called deep reading, the kind you do when reading an absorbing novel or engaging material is the most beneficial. So rather than reading to surf the net, catch up on Twitter feeds or reply to a text, you’ll try to engage in some amount of deep reading. This is not only more engaging, it helps to stimulate your mind, cut stress, reshape the circuits of your brain and may even improve your social skills. Oh, and you get to read a great, compelling story too.

To your good health,

geralt / Pixabay

5 Tips To Prevent Alzheimer’s

These are are sobering numbers. Today estimates from the Alzheimer’s Association suggest that about 44 million people are coping with dementia the world over, with that number expected to triple by 2050 to 115 million. So many people… so much misery. To combat these frightening numbers, experts discussed the latest research at the 2014 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference held in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Here are five important discoveries that came from the conference.

1. Having hypertension in old age may actually protect your brain. Though high blood pressure is known as the “silent killer”, a new study out of the University of California suggest that if you’re over 90 years old, this condition can actually save your brain cells.

The team followed 625 subjects who developed hypertension in their 90s for up to a decade and found that their risk for dementia was 55% lower than those who had a medical history of hypertension. Naturally the study isn’t saying hypertension is good for you, especially considering that it is tied to many other bad things.

Instead, the study presents the idea that when it comes to normal blood pressure, a one-size-fits-all approach may not be right for older people.

2. Lifestyle changes are better made late than never at all. There are a number of changes to lifestyle that can lower the risk for late life cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s. This finding comes as the result of a two-year clinical trial out of the Karolinska Institutet and the Finnish Institute for Health.

The work included 1,260 subjects who were from 60 to 77 years old. One group got a “lifestyle package” that included guidance on what to eat, physical activity and management of heart health risk factors, mental training and social function. The control group got standard health advice, and after two years, the lifestyle package group performed far better on tests of memory and thinking skills.

Start implementing those lifestyle changes at midlife and you can help fight off Alzheimer’s disease. It’s never too late.

3. Playing mental games makes your brain larger. Turns out middle-aged people who are avid game players tend to have bigger brains than those who didn’t do these kinds of activities according to a study that examined brain scans. Think of it like looking at muscle mass – bad when it’s small, good when it’s bigger.

When the researchers examined specific parts of the subject’s brains, they saw that that areas that tend to be damaged by Alzheimer’s disease were actually bigger. These larger areas are associated with higher scores on tests of cognitive ability. Mixing up the games, or engaging in another stimulating activity, is great for the brain – anything that offers a cognitive challenge keeps the brain in shape over the long haul.

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Overweight? Shocking Proof that it may not be your fault

99% of the “professional” weight loss techniques are wrong – ending up with you actually putting on weight rather than losing it.

Find out why counting calories is bad for you and can sabotage your dieting efforts.

Click through now to discover how to drop 9lbs every 11 days…
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5 Tips To Prevent Alzheimer’s Continued…

4. Exercise benefits your brain. Being active appears to slow the progression toward dementia according to two sets of data out of the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. What’s more, exercise positively influences how mild cognitive impairment and dementia present and progress.

In one group of subjects who had mild cognitive impairment, working out appeared to protect against developing dementia. Data for another group of healthy patients who exercised showed they were less apt to be diagnosed with cognitive impairment than those who did not exercise, either lightly or vigorously.

While not a cure, exercise is certainly good for your brain.

5. Alzheimer’s may soon be detected by a smell test. A test of your sense of smell might actually help your doctor tell if you are at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. Results from two separate projects find that those who were unable to identify some odors were more likely to experience cognitive impairment. The experts think that the brain cells that are key to a sense of smell may be killed off in the early stages of dementia. A simple, non-invasive diagnostic test would be a huge step forward.

With a test to spot the early symptoms, doctors believe they could intervene early and treat sooner, and this will slow the progression of this devastating disease.

To your good health,

geralt / Pixabay

Study: Higher Risk Of dementia With Cynicism Linked

Negative thinking is really not very good for your health, not to mention your mental outlook or peace of mind, but it can be surprisingly easy to slip into and hard to shake. New research in the journal Neurology finds that cynical people have a greater chance of developing dementia. Cynicism is a deep mistrust of other people, and psychologists think of this as a kind of chronic anger that comes on over time. The type of cynicism examined as part of the study involved subjects doubting the truth of what people said, believing most of us are motivated by self interest rather than other, more positive drives.

Earlier work in this area has found that those who are cynical are more likely to die sooner and have poorer health than others, but no studies have specifically focused on dementia risk. There has been research that discovered those who are more open and upbeat have a lower risk of dementia, so the opposite is an area worthy of investigation.

The project involved 1,449 subjects of an average age of 71, who took a test for dementia and another to measure how cynical they were. Both were consider3ed reliable measures by experts. Those who agreed with cynical statements on the exam were considered to be highly cynical. Those with the highest level of cynical distrust had a 2.54 times higher risk of having dementia than those with the lower cynicism ratings. The team also examined the results to see if the participants who were highly cynical died earlier than others, but once compounding factors were removed they didn’t, even though earlier work has shown a link between cynicism and earlier death.

This research doesn’t prove that having a negative, cynical attitude toward life brings on bad outcomes to your health. This research wasn’t designed to do that. More work is needed to reproduce the conclusions found here, though the results do compliment a wide body of study that shows how over time, those with high levels of cynical hostility do worse in terms of health. They certainly are not happy people.

The link between an attitude and health outcome is very complex, though doctors will say that poor attitudes can lead patients down a road to poorer health. Author Dr. Hilary Tindle, a professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh was also the lead author on research that looked at the health outcomes of just over 97,000 women and saw that the cynical ones had a higher risk of cancer related death.

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Overweight? Shocking Proof that it may not be your fault

99% of the “professional” weight loss techniques are wrong – ending up with you actually putting on weight rather than losing it.

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Study: Higher Risk Of dementia With Cynicism Linked Continued…

Cynical people have also been shown to smoke more, workout less and be heavier overall. They have a harder time following medical advice because their cynical thought process refuses to let them believe what anyone tells them. Cynical souls also have greater stress responses, and this suggests a higher heart rate, higher blood pressure peak and a tendency to more inflammation in the immune system. Chronic inflammation is what experts tell us is harmful to your overall health and has been linked to conditions like Crohn’s disease, high cholesterol and even Alzheimer’s.

Previous studies have also shown t hat those who are cynical also have a higher risk of heart disease, cardiovascular issues and death related to cancer. Cardiovascular disease is a condition that can contribute to dementia by damaging the small blood vessels all over the body, and that includes your brain.

It’s always possible to change your cynical attitude… you are not doomed to stay this way, be plagued by damaging, negative thoughts. You can change, just like people do when they stop smoking, go on a diet, cut back drinking or cut out unhealthy relationships. People make changes for the better every day, you can too.

To your good health,

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Diabetes, Hypertension Can Cause Memory Problems Later

Here’s news on an important new study appearing in the journal Neurology. Anyone who is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure during middle age seems to be more likely to have brain damage that contributes to dementia as they get older. While diabetes and problems with memory and cognition later on have been linked before; this is the first study to offer solid evidence that explains just why this happens.

The thinking is that diabetes might really be shrinking the brain over the long haul, cutting the size of key areas such as the hippocampus. This is the structure that plays a huge role in both short and long term memory. What’s more, when high blood pressure is added to the mix, the two together appear to up your risks of micro strokes and other types of damage to the blood vessels that feed the brain.

The current study included over 1,400 people of an average age of 80 years old who had (at most) slight memory and cognitive problems classified as mild cognitive impairment. The team measured the subjects’ thinking and memory abilities and noted any areas of mild impairment. The subjects then underwent MRI scans to look for brain damage that can be an early indicator of dementia.

As a final step, the team reviewed the subjects’ medical records to see if they had been diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure during their middle age. The team saw that those who had diabetes at midlife had brains that were 2.9% smaller than those who didn’t have this disease. The hippocampus of these subjects were even smaller, 4% smaller (on average) than non-diabetics. When the hippocampus starts to shrink, you start losing your long-term memory, as well as your ability to bring to mind recent events.

Continues below…


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Diabetes, Hypertension Can Cause Memory Problems Later Continued…

Diabetes at midlife was also linked with an 85% greater risk of micro-strokes in the brain. These subjects were also two times as likely to have memory or thinking problems than those who did not have this disease earlier in life. Also those who had high blood pressure at midlife were two times as likely to show damage due to stroke to parts of the brain that are linked to thinking, memory and language.

According to lead study author Dr. Rosebud Roberts from the Mayo Clinic, those who had diabetes earlier in life have a much poorer brain structure than those who got it later on. Cognitive impairment appears to come over a long time period, so if you have diabetes earlier, there’s more time to do more damage.

Alzheimer’s Association director of scientific programs Keith Fargo was very excited about the study. Many people mistakenly think that the risk for Alzheimer’s disease comes only if it runs in their family, but this is not true. Dementia can hit anyone if they don’t take care of themselves. This research points out the very real need for people in their 40s, 50s and 60s to live a healthier lifestyle so they can avoid disease now, and in the years to come.

To your good health,